Archive for the ‘India’ Category

Weekly Links

Down to Earth

The United States federal government remains partial shutdown as it has been since mid-December. This is far more than a story about NASA, of course. But since this is a space blog, here is an article from the Orlando Sentinel about how the current situation is affecting some NASA contractors in Florida.

NASA’s Independent Verification and Validation Center in West Virginia has been renamed for Katherine Johnson, a native of the state.

Nancy Grace Roman, who served as NASA’s chief of astronomy in the 1970’s and is credited with ensuring the Hubble Space Telescope project moved forward, has died at 93 years of age.

The Dragon capsule for “Demo Mission 1” was rolled out to the launch pad in Florida. This test mission will be in preparation for the first flight with astronauts onboard.

NASA had to postpone a visit by the head of Roscosmos (Russia’s space agency) due to political pressure.

In Orbit

It’s been a tough time for space telescopes. The Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3 is currently inactive due to a malfunction. Also, Russia’s Spektr-R telescope is reportedly out of communication.

There were 10 orbital rocket launches since my last post on December 16th:

On the ISS, things have been busy with the usual ebb and flow of operations. On December 19th, the three person crew of Alex Gerst, Serena Aunon-Chancellor, and Sergey Propokyev returned to Earth in their Soyuz capsule.

Meanwhile, the remaining ISS crew was busy organizing supplies and conducting science delivered on the latest Dragon capsule. The capsule, designated Dragon-16, returned to Earth on Sunday, January 13th, splashing down for recovery in the Pacific Ocean.

Around the Solar System

NASA’s New Horizons probe – famous for its flyby of Pluto in 2015 – successfully imaged a distant Kuiper Belt object known as 2014 MU69, or Ultima Thule. This flyby was many years in the making, even though the object was discovered well after New Horizons launched in 2006.

China successfully landed their second lunar rover, Yutu 2, part of the Chang’e 4 mission, on the far side of the moon.

Weekly Links

It’s been a busy and important few weeks in spaceflight. Some major milestones linked below.

Down to Earth

NASA announced nine recipients in the Commercial Lunar Payload Services program.

Virgin Galactic completed a successful powered flight of SpaceShipTwo, reaching over 80 km altitude (note that some organizations define space at 80 km while others define it at 100 km).

In Orbit

Among the launches listed below, the most significant is probably the Soyuz launch from Kazakhstan, which was a return to flight for the ISS program. Cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko and astronauts Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques launched safely and docked to the ISS.

Meanwhile, the crew from the failed launch in October has been reassigned to a future flight.

There have been 9 orbital launches since my last post on November 25:

  • November 29 – An Indian PSLV rocket launched carrying an Earth observing satellite.
  • November 30 – A Russian Rokot rocket carrying communications satellites.
  • December 3 – A Russian Soyuz rocket launched with three crew headed for the ISS.
  • December 3 – A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched from California delivered a plethora of payloads.
  • December 4 – An ESA Ariane 5 rocket launched carrying satellites for India and South Korea.
  • December 5 – A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched carrying a resupply flight for the ISS.
  • December 7 – A Chinese Long March 2D rocket launched carrying payloads for Saudi Arabia.
  • December 7 – A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched carrying the Chang’e 4 mission to the moon.
  • December 16 – A Rocket Lab Electron rocket launched from New Zealand carrying a number of cubesats.

The first stage booster for the Falcon 9 rocket launch on December 5th had to abort its return to launch site landing and ditch in the ocean.

Meanwhile, the Dragon capsule successfully arrived at ISS.

The two Russian cosmonauts currently aboard the ISS conducted a lengthy spacewalk last week to inspect their Soyuz capsule from the outside.

Around the Solar System

NASA’s latest Mars lander, Insight, successfully touched down on the Martian surface last month and has already begun operations. Below is a picture from the lander.

NASA’s Osiris-Rex is now station keeping near asteroid Bennu. The probe has already discovered water-bearing minerals in the asteroid.

Voyager 2 has passed through the heliopause and into interstellar space.

Weekly Links

Down to Earth

A major election took place in the USA this month, with implications for the future of NASA and space exploration, among many other policy concerns. Here is a brief summary from The Planetary Society of some of the impacts to members of congressional space and science committees.

The ISS was prominent in pop culture this last week. Check out the short Macy’s ad below and then the longer sketch scene from SNL.

In Orbit

Seven orbital launches since my last post on November 4th. With 92 successful launches as of today, 2018 is poised to have the most launches in a year since the early 1990s.

  • November 7 – An ESA Soyuz rocket launched from French Guiana carrying a weather satellite.
  • November 11 – New Zealand’s Rocket Lab launched an Electron rocket carrying their first commercial payloads.
  • November 14 – An Indian GSLV rocket launched carrying a communications satellite.
  • November 15 – A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched from California carrying a communication satellite for Qatar.
  • November 16 – A Russian Soyuz-FG rocket launched from Kazakhstan carrying a Progress resupply flight for the ISS.
  • November 17 – A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket launched a Cyngus spacecraft on its way to the ISS.
  • November 18 – A Chinese Long March 3B rocket launched carrying two Beidou navigation satellites.

The Progress robotic resupply reached the ISS and successfully docked on Sunday.

An HTV cargo vehicle departed the ISS carrying trash, but also a small return capsule. The return capsule was an experimental new way to return science from the ISS, and was retrieved successfully at sea.

Around the Solar System

Check out this new imagery of asteroid Bennu from the OSIRIS-Rex spacecraft.

Weekly Links

Down to Earth

NASA’s Marshall SpaceFlight Center has a new Director, Jody Singer.

Members of the Jet Propulsion Lab’s media relations team have won an Emmy Award for coverage of the Cassini mission.

Holly Ridings has been named the new chief of the Flight Director office at NASA’s Johnson Space Center.

Veteran NASA astronaut Tim Kopra has left the agency. He flew to space twice, once serving as ISS commander.

SpaceX has announced that Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa has paid to be a passenger on a test flight around the moon.

In Orbit

The following orbital launches have occurred since my last post.

  • September 10 – SpaceX launched a Falcon 9 rocket from Florida carrying a Canadian communications satellite.
  • September 15 – ULA launched a Delta II rocket from California carrying several research payloads.
  • September 16 – India launched a PSLV rocket carrying two Earth-observation satellites.
  • September 19 – China launched a Long March 3B rocket carrying two Beidou navigation satellites.
  • September 22 – Japan launched an H-II rocket carrying an HTV cargo freighter bound for the ISS.
  • September 25 – ESA launched an Ariane 5 rocket carrying two communications satelites.
  • September 29 – China launched a Kuaizhou rocket carrying a small technology demonstration payload.
  • October 8 – SpaceX launched a Falcon 9 rocket from California carrying an Argentinian Earth-observation satellite.

The HTV-7 cargo vehicle was captured and berthed to the ISS several days after it launched.

A Soyuz spacecraft carrying the returning ISS Expedition 56 crew has landed safely in Kazakhstan. Now that Drew Feustel, Ricky Arnold, and Oleg Artemyev are home, the next Soyuz is readying for launch. The Expedition 57 crew of Nick Hague and Aleksey Ovchinin are preparing to launch on Thursday, October 11, which will brin ghte ISS crew back up to 5 people.

The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has entered safe mode due to a failed gyroscope.

Around the Solar System

Still no news from beleaguered Opportunity rover, on the surface of Mars. It has been 4 months.

And now on the other side of Mars, the Curiosity rover is having issues of its own. JPL engineers are troubleshooting an interruption in science data from the larger rover.

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has successfully deployed 2 small rovers from the Hayabusa 2 spacecraft onto the surface of asteroid Ryugu.

Out There

Astronomers have detected the first evidence of an exomoon (or moon around a planet around another star) using data from the Kepler and Hubble space telescopes. The planetary system is 8,000 lightyears distant.

A bit of fun exoplanet news: astronomers have discovered a planet in orbit around 40 Eridani A, which is the star system of the fictional planet Vulcan from Star Trek.

And lastly in the busy period of astronomy news, a new dwarf planet has been discovered beyond Pluto.

Weekly Links

Down to Earth

NASA announced a new class of 6 flight directors for human spaceflight at Johnson Space Center.

The Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) performed a pad abort test of their launch escape tower for future crewed spaceflights.

Launch towers at Launch Complex 17 at Cape Canaveral were demolished last week. These launch towers were built for the now retired Delta II rocket. Instead, Moon Express will use the site.

Launch industry newcomer Rocket Lab plans to open a second launch site somewhere in the USA.

James Morhard has been nominated to the open position of NASA deputy administrator.

Astronaut Dan Burbank has retired from NASA.

In Orbit

NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope has entered a hibernation mode as it nears the end of its long mission.

There were three orbital rocket launches since my last post on July 1st:

Operations have been busy on the International Space Station. The Dragon resupply ship that launched at the end of June arrived at ISS on July 2nd. Then the above mentioned Progress resupply arrived.

On Sunday morning, the latest Cygnus cargo spacecraft departed the ISS packed full of trash. Before it left, it performed a demonstration maneuver to reboost the ISS.

Upcoming notable launches include a SpaceX launch from Florida on July 20th and a SpaceX launch from California on July 22nd. Still no firm launch date on the rescheduled Rocket Lab launch.

Around the Solar System

Still no update from NASA’s Opportunity rover, which has been socked in by a dust storm on Mars.

Weekly Links

Down to Earth

Elon Musk was busy this week entertaining his fans with tidbits about future SpaceX plans, including the tweet below, as well as this picture on Instagram of a tool for their next larger rocket, the BFR.

NASA’s Planetary Science Division Director, Jim Greene, is now the agency’s new chief scientist.

Check out this music video by Snow Patrol which uses imagery from the ISS and was partially filmed at ESA.

In Orbit

There were three orbital rocket launches since my last post:

On Monday, April 16th, A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch carrying NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) space telescope.

Around the Solar System

The International Astronautical Union (IAU) has approved official names for features on Pluto’s moon Charon, some named after iconic sci-fi figures such as Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke.

Because images of Saturn are just so damn stunning, here’s Saturn’s moon Dione as imaged by the late Cassini spacecraft.

Moon Dione and Saturn’s rings edge-on

Weekly Links

Down to Earth

VSS Unity, the latest spacecraft from Virgin Galactic, made its first powered flight test yesterday. Video below.

The Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum has a new executive director: Ellen Stofan, former NASA chief scientist.

Ars Technica interviewed Peggy Whitson. Check out the video below.

In Orbit

There were only two orbital launches in the past week:

  • April 2 – SpaceX launched a Falcon 9 rocket carrying a Dragon resupply capsule to the ISS.
  • April 6 – ESA launched an Ariane 5 rocket carrying a pair of communications satellites.

The Dragon spacecraft arrived at the ISS two days later where the station astronauts grappled it with the robotic arm. A busy month of operations now begins as the astronauts unpack the Dragon and begin new science experiments.

The Indian space agency (ISRO) lost contact with a communications satellite they launched last week.

Around the Solar System

In case you forgot we have robotic rovers exploring other planets, here are some fresh photos from the surface of Mars.

Out There

Hubble has taken an image of the most distant star ever discovered. The star, which is billions of light years away, was found through gravitational lensing.

Weekly Links

Down to Earth

NASA announced last week that the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) launch date is slipping about a year to May 2020.

Apollo 8 astronauts Frank Borman and Jim Lovell celebrated their 90th birthdays.

Ars Technica got Chris Hadfield to open up on some details of his viral Space Oddity video, shot on the ISS.

The Chinese Tiangong-1 space station completed its long-anticipated uncontrolled re-entry today, somewhere over the South Pacific.

In Orbit

Last Thursday, March 29, astronauts Drew Feustel and Ricky Arnold exited the ISS airlock for a full six-hour spacewalk to conduct repairs and maintenance.

There were five orbital rocket launches since my last post a week ago:

Tomorrow, Monday, April 2, SpaceX will be launching a Falcon 9 rocket carrying a Dragon capsule to the ISS. Below is a video from CASIS with an overview of the science launching on the mission.

Out There

Astronomers have discovered a galaxy which has no dark matter – the first galaxy discovered of this kind.

Weekly Links

Down to Earth

Virgin Galactic conducted their first glide flight of SpaceShipTwo since last August.

SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy has been attempting to conduct a static fire test ahead of launch, but has scrubbed three days in a row. It has been rescheduled for Monday.

In Orbit

Launches this past week included:

In the case of the SpaceX launch, there have been many reports from reliable journalists over the past week that the classified Zuma payload perhaps did not reach orbit. However, no official statement has yet been forthcoming.

Upcoming launches of interest include a ULA Atlas V from Florida on Jan 19, the next Rocket Lab Electron launch attempt on Jan 20, and SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy test flight (possibly on Jan 25?).

On the ISS, the 13th SpaceX Dragon mission ended successfully with release and splashdown. SpaceX ships are currently retrieving the capsule to return its science samples.

Weekly Links

I’m back from my own personal August recess and catching up on almost a month of space news. Here’s your headline dump for August 14 to September 9! A lot has happened

Down to Earth

The Trump Administration has named Oklahoma Congressman Jim Bridenstine as their nominee for NASA administrator.

The Chinese and European astronauts conducted a joint survival training exercise off the coast of China.

Sierra Nevada Corporation conducted a “captive carry” flight of their Dream Chaser spaceplane.

Last week an ESA Ariane 5 rocket had a pad abort. The agency is still investigating.

In Orbit

The Dragon capsule launched two days earlier docked with the ISS on August 16th.

The day after the cargo. arrival, cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy conducted a successful spacewalk to do space station maintenance as well as some small satellites deployments.

Then on September 3rd a Soyuz returned to Earth, safely carrying Jack Fischer, Peggy Whitson, and Fyodor Yurchikhin to the steppes of Kazakhstan. Both Yurchikhin and Whitson now have accumulated over 600 days in space.

Meanwhile on the ground, a dedicated team of flight controllers was riding out Hurricane Harvey in Houston’s Mission Control Center to ensure the successful undocking and return of the crew.

Speaking of hurricanes, the ISS crew has taken some incredible imagery of Irma has it makes its way across the Caribbean and now Florida.

Lots of launches while I was out. Here’s a worldwide rundown:

Around the Solar System

Congratulations to the engineers and scientists on the New Horizons project; the International Astronomical Union has selected many of their original choices for features on Pluto as official names!

Good news for Mars enthusiasts: there is new talk at NASA of planning a robotic Mars sample return mission for the middle of the 2020s.