Archive for the ‘HERA’ Category

Weekly Links

Down to Earth

Leonardo DiCaprio is going to produce a new TV series based on The Right Stuff.

NASA’s new TDRS-M satellite had a mishap during pre-flight processing. Launch has been rescheduled while repairs are conducted.

Virgin Galactic conducted another drop test of their SpaceShipTwo vehicle at the Mojave Air and Space Port.

NASA’s fourteenth crew of the Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) program started their 45-day mission yesterday.

Rocket startup Vector Space Systems conducted a test launch of their suborbital rocket on Thursday. Here’s a short video of liftoff.

In Orbit

The International Space Station crew is back up to 6 after a new Soyuz launched from Kazakhstan and docked just a few hours later. The three new ISS crew members, Sergey Ryazanskiy, Paolo Nespoli, and Randy Bresnik, are all spaceflight veterans.

There are now 5 active Twitter users on ISS, sharing their thoughts, activities, and views with us! Check out their posts at this feed.

In addition to the Soyuz launch, the only other rocket launch in the past two weeks was a European Space Agency Vega rocket. The rocket launched on August 2 from French Guiana carrying two earth observing satellites.

Around the Solar System

In case you had forgotten that there are two active NASA rovers on the surface of Mars, here are some beautiful panoramas from Opportunity, on the edge of Endeavour crater.

Results are in of the stellar occultation observation of object 2014 MU69, and astronomers think it may actually be a binary, rather that single piece of rock. 2014 MU69 is the Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) that the New Horizons spacecraft will visit in 2019.

New evidence suggests there may be more water hidden beneath the surface of the moon than previously thought.

Out There

Speaking of moons, a new paper analyzing the light curve data from Kepler of a distant star shows the possibility of a large planet with a large moon in orbit. Hubble is scheduled to do follow up observations in October to confirm the finding.

Weekly Links

Down to Earth

Space Camp USA, in Huntsville, Alabama, unveiled a new outdoor display of one of the former Shuttle Training Aircraft.

NASA completed some egress testing of the Orion capsule in the Gulf of Mexico.

Here’s a nice short video that will help you get to know Randy Bresnik, who is launching to the ISS next week.

I also enjoyed this short biographical video about Ana Fisher, one of the first American women astronauts.

The latest of NASA’s medium-duration isolation spaceflight analog crews, HERA 13, finished their mission last week.

The independent NASA visitor center in Houston, Space Center Houston, has announced a Kickstarter campaign to help raise additional funds for their project to restore MOCR2 in the Christopher C. Kraft Mission Control Center on the Johnson Space Center campus. MOCR2 is most famous for being the flight control room during the Apollo 11 lunar landing. However, it was used for every Apollo flight starting with Apollo 8, as well as many Space Shuttle missions. In addition to being a site of much triumph (Apollo 8, Apollo 11, STS-1, etc) it was also the active control room during the Apollo 1 fire and the launch of Challenger on STS-51L. Here’s the Kickstarter link. I have already pledged!

Google has posted a brand new “street view” tour from inside the International Space Station! To get to it, navigate to NASA Johnson Space Center on Google Maps and drop the street view icon right on top of Building 9 Space Vehicle Mockup Facility.

In Orbit

Up on the actual ISS, the crew has been busy getting ready for the arrival of the next crew on July 27th. The Progress cargo craft departed with trash on July 20th.

But the NASA crew of Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson still had time to share their mission with us with a couple informative videos:

Only one rocket launch since my last post on July 9th. Russia launched a Soyuz rocket from Kazakhstan carrying payloads for commercial companies, including an impressive array of small “Dove” satellites for American company Planet. Even more impressively, Planet captured this beautiful footage of the launch from one of their spacecraft already in orbit:

Around the Solar System

To celebrate two years since the New Horizons flyby of Pluto, NASA released this amazing video that simulates a flyover of Pluto using mission imagery.

Speaking of the New Horizons mission, NASA’s amazing airborne observatory SOFIA did a special mission to catch an occultation of 2014 MU69, the Kuiper Belt object that the probe will visit next. Check out Phil Plait’s post on the event for some actual images of the occultation.

Out at Jupiter, NASA’s  Juno probe did a close flyby of the Great Red Spot and returned some amazing images.

Rejected

Like many aspiring spacefarers, I finally received a long anticipated email this past Thursday. Paradoxically, the anticipation resulted from already knowing the news the email would contain. Given that NASA had announced the new Class of 2017 of astronaut candidates the week before, it was no surprise to me and about 17,000 others to get an email from the astronaut selection office which effectively said “thanks, better luck next time.”

As a young engineer with only one degree and less than a decade of experience, my application was a longshot, and will continue to be until I expand my experience base significantly. It is hard to compete with military pilots, doctors, and scientists that have traveled to Antarctica! My role in humanity’s exploration of outer space continues to be from a desk in mission control – only the second best job I can imagine.

And if you don’t work in mission control, there are still ways you can help. At the end of Thursday’s email were some helpful links about how to stay involved. However, I was a little disappointed that the email blast to thousands of motivated Americans wasn’t better utilized to plug some important volunteer opportunities to directly help with preparations for future missions.

Firstly, there are the various analog missions. NASA conducts their HERA missions in a small pressurized facility on-site at Johnson Space Center. The campaign is currently doing 45-day missions and they are always looking for interested “astronauts”. NASA also participates in the HI-SEAS project in Hawaii, which simulates deep space missions in a habitat on Mauna Loa. But, if you don’t have enough time to commit to the more lengthy analog missions, you can do what I’ve done, and volunteer with NASA to be a human test subject.

Last year I participated in two interesting experiments to help with NASA’s data-gathering on astronauts who return from the ISS. The first study – the easy one – involved driving a Mars rover simulator (the fun part) after 30 hours of sleep deprivation (the not so fun part).

Driving the martian rover simulator

Driving the martian rover simulator

In addition to the Mars rover, I did a few other cognitive and tactile tests on an iPad. Some of the tests are the same ones given to astronauts before, during, and after their flight. The idea is to see how ISS missions affect crew performance, especially if they are sleeping less up there.

The second study (called exMOD) was much more challenging. In the exMOD study, NASA was investigating the apparent changes to eyesight experienced by ISS astronauts. One of the hypotheses is that microgravity affects the intraocular pressure. In order to see what affect strenuous exercise has on the eyes – since we ask the crew to exercise many hours a day while onboard the ISS – I was fitted with a strain gauge in a contact lens (see picture below) and then asked to do strenuous exercise in an inverted position… oh yeah and did I mention the swimming goggles they added to make sure there was extra pressure on the eye?IMG_0521

After a tough few minutes of cycling during exMOD

After a tough few minutes of cycling during exMOD

The eye study was strenuous and exhausting. It wasn’t “fun” in the sense that I enjoyed it while it was happening. But every day that I reported in for the study, I felt a sense of excitement knowing I was helping NASA scientists and doctors better understand the specific and strange effects that the human body experiences during spaceflight. It is a unique opportunity that is available here at the Johnson Space Center, and the good news is that it is not just for people like me who are already on the “in crowd”. Anyone can apply to be a human test subject (see link below) and they are still looking for about a dozen more people for this year’s Fitness for Mission Tasks (FMT) study.

FMT is more exciting for me than exMOD was (and I’m promised that it is not as exhausting). The idea behind FMT is to try to gather a baseline of data across a variety of demographics on the level of strength required to complete certain mission tasks (walk around a Mars base, rescue a fellow crew member, escape a capsule after splashdown). They do this by first putting me through various tests and measuring things like my deadlift, bench press, VO2 max, etc. Then I do timed trials of all of the planned tasks. The fun part then takes place in the last 4 sessions, where I am timed completing the same tasks with a weight suit weighing from 20% up to 80% of my own body weight. The idea is to approximate the weakness or muscle atrophy caused by months of interplanetary travel without having to do a lengthy bedrest study.

So, you don’t have to get a callback from the astronaut selection office to play astronaut. There are plenty of practical opportunities to directly contribute to our ability to send humans into space. Of course, for the FMT study, you need to be able to report to JSC for the study. Check out the links below and check back in here where I will try to post pictures of my FMT time trials in the coming weeks!

NASA Human Test Subject program: https://www.nasa.gov/feature/human-test-subject

Apply for HERA: https://www.nasa.gov/analogs/hera/want-to-participate

Hi-Seas: http://hi-seas.org/

Weekly Links

Down to Earth

Easily the top story of the past couple of weeks (sorry, OSIRIS-REx) was the loss of a Falcon 9 rocket with its commercial satellite payload on the pad during a pre-launch static fire test (video below). The pad, Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) was damaged in the fire (pictures here) and SpaceX is currently still investigating the cause. It is impossible to speculate on what kind of setback this will cause in their launch manifest until some notion of the cause is determined. SpaceX still has one operational launch pad in California.

Just 3 days before the SpaceX pad fire, the Chinese space program suffered a failure in what is apparently the first launch failure of the year. The Long March 4C rocket was expected to put a reconnaissance satellite in orbit.

As for positive news, NASA’s troubled Mars lander InSight has been greenlit for a launch sometime in 2018.

Another goodie was Virgin Galactic conducting the first test flight of the new SpaceShipTwo (although just a captive carry flight).

Check out this blog post from one of the recent crew members of NASA’s asteroid mission simulation, HERA. Tess was on the crew of HERA 11.

The most important thing to come “down to Earth” last week was the crew of Expedition 48. Jeff Williams, Oleg Skripochka, and Aleksey Ovchinin landed in Kazakhstan last Wednesday after a flawless undocking and re-entry.

In Orbit

Before Expedition 48 ended, Jeff Williams and Kate Rubins conducted their second spacewalk in as many weeks, repairing and upgrading a slew of items outside the ISS.

Fortunately, there were at least two successful launches to offset the failures in early September. First, an Indian GSLV Mark II rocket lofted a weather satellite. Secondly, a ULA Atlas V rocket launched NASA’s OSIRIS-REx probe on its 7-year journey to visit an asteroid and return to Earth with samples.

Around the Solar System

On Mars, the Curiosity rover is currently trundling through some incredible landscapes, snapping photos of beautiful buttes and rock layers.

Juno continues to return data from Jupiter, including a stunning image of the north pole.

And last but not least, one of the coolest stories of the last week, the European Space Agency finally located the lost comet lander, Philae, just weeks before the orbiter Rosetta is due to end its own mission. Check out the pictures!

Weekly Links

Down to Earth

Check out this new video posted by SpaceX from their recent rocket landing:

The iconic Arecibo Observatory may be shut down.

A large meteor burned up spectacularly near Phoenix, Arizona last week.

In Orbit

The only launch of the past week was a Russian Rokot booster carrying a remote-sensing satellite.

Astronauts on the International Space Station will enter their new expandable module, BEAM, for the first time today.

Part of a Russian rocket, still in space after a launch many years ago, exploded in orbit last week.

Some exciting upcoming launches include a Delta IV Heavy from Florida on the 9th and another Falcon 9 on the 14th (as always, check out the “2016 in spaceflight” Wikipedia page for a good summary).

Around the Solar System

ESA’s Rosetta probe has confirmed the existence of the amino acid glycine in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

Home base report – HERA IX mission day 9

I don’t usually use this blog to post personal stuff. I’m actually quite happy with how not bloggy my blog is. However, there is something pretty cool going on in my personal life this month: my wife is locked up in a NASA simulation pretending to be an astronaut on her way to an asteroid. That’s pretty cool, so I’ll make an exception for some non-standard blogginess.

The HERA IX crew is still locked inside their habitat in Building 220 and JSC and hasn’t come out since they entered last Monday evening. Tonight will be their 10th night of 31 on their indoor camping trip. They are cut off not just physically but also virtually, with no outside communication besides mission control and a weekly family phone call. This is because one of the many experiments for this year’s HERA campaign has to do with the psychological and interpersonal aspects of being isolated with your fellow astronauts away from friends and family. If they were constantly connected via email, text message, or other forms of the internet, they could escape from that isolation and the data would not be the same.

Unfortunately, this means we can’t hear from Leah and the rest of the crew about how they are doing! The last private family call I had with Leah, or Mission Specialist 2, was last Friday. At the time, they were on mission day 4 and the crew was doing quite well. Leah said the food was very good and that everyone was getting along. The food they get to eat is the very same food that the ISS astronauts eat from the JSC food lab. In addition, they are testing out some new types of food that may get used for future Orion exploration missions because they are denser, thus saving weight.

Leah said that they had been so busy that they hadn’t had much time for down time like watching movies and reading books. Mission day 6, this past Sunday, was their first full day off so they may have got a little more relaxing in, unless mission control had some unplanned surprises for them like emergency drills! They are simulating as many aspects of spaceflight as possible including emergency drills, spacecraft maneuvers, spacewalks, and human experimentation. Just like the astronauts onboard ISS, they are doing experiments on themselves which involve saliva and blood samples, activity tracking, and all kinds of psychological and cognitive tests. Unlike the astronauts onboard ISS, they are wired up even more to get as much data s possible. Since Leah and her crew do not have real science to conduct like up on ISS, they are free to be encumbered by all kinds of trackers all over their body, including heart rate monitors, temperature sensors, and more.

Meanwhile, I’ve been left alone at home with the dog, trying to pretend my wife is really an astronaut in space. Honestly, it really doesn’t feel like that. It does feel like she’s far away – even though I can see building 220 from my desk. What it really feels like is that she’s on deployment with the military or on some other kind of dangerous job where I can’t talk to her much. I know she is quite safe, and could come home anytime if she wanted, but I at least have a small inkling now of both what it’s like to be an astronaut’s spouse and also a military spouse. You really have to respect families that have this kind of separation as a normal part of their life.

The meat of the mission is about to start. On mission day 11, this Friday, I get another private phone call with Leah (yay!) but then the HERA IX crew will go into radio silence for twelve days. The middle portion of the mission will involve a simulated communications delay with mission control as they are on “approach” to asteroid Geographos in deep space. In order to preserve the illusion, no private family calls will be allowed during the comm delay part of the mission. Their conversations with mission control will take at least several minutes round trip for every thing they say. That is going to feel like true isolation!

So while I’ll be at home feeling a bit lonely, Leah will be getting to some of the most exciting parts of the mission! When they get to Geographos, they get to do their simulated EVAs and pick up asteroid samples for scientific testing. Leah is designated as “EV1” and gets to use the virtual reality gear to do her “spacewalk”. Pretty cool!

I can’t help but be proud of my wife and the whole HERA IX crew. It’s one thing to sit at home reading spaceflight news and tweeting about it. Getting to work in mission control and monitor spacecraft health and status data is of course awesome… but all of that feels quite silly compared to putting oneself out there as a test subject and sacrificing personal comfort to help collect data that will be used to further exploration, which is exactly what the HERA IX crew is doing. I can’t wait for Leah to come home but at the moment, I wouldn’t rather her be anywhere else than where she is right now on the front lines of NASA’s Human Research Program. Go #HERAIX!

Update: Here’s an interview with HERA project manager Lesa Spence