Archive for the ‘Ceres’ Category

Weekly Links

Down To Earth

Here are some new high resolution images from the SpaceX booster flyback landing last week.

And here is a nice shot of the booster being returned to the SpaceX launch complex.

United Launch Alliance has ordered more of the RD-180 engines that power its Atlas rockets. This is the Russian-built engine that has been causing political controversy since early 2014, since American politicians understandably don’t want our military satellites dependent on a geopolitical adversary’s technology. The new engines are only planned to be used for civil and commercial launches.

Meanwhile, the USAF awarded a bunch of money to several companies for propulsion development so that RD-180s won’t have to be purchased in the future.

Components of ESA’s ExoMars mission have arrived at the launch site in Kazakhstan. Launch is coming up quick in March!

Russia’s space agency, Roscosmos, was dissolved by law this week under the ongoing reorganization of the space industry going on in that country.

Oak Ridge in Tennessee has produced the first Plutonium-238 in decades. This non-weapons grade nuclear fuel is needed for the RTG power sources of deep space missions.

In Orbit

Only two launches since my last post on December 22nd: a Russian Proton rocket* with a communications satellite and a Chinese rocket with an Earth observation satellite. With no apparent planned launches for the rest of the year (according to my favorite Wikipedia page), that leaves the yearly totals as seen below, with Russia at 25 successful launches and China and the US tied at 18. If SpaceX had launched as many Falcon 9s as they had hoped this year, then the US may have matched or surpassed Russia’s numbers for the first time since probably 2003*. Comments from Musk at a recent press conference indicate he hopes for 12 launches in 2016. We will see.

Screen shot 2015-12-28 at 10.45.06 PM

*The Proton is the rocket that seemed to blow up every other launch a couple of years ago. Although there has been only been one failure every year since 2012, the failure rate has remained about the same since 2010, with 4 out of 32 launches failed 2010 to 2012 and 3 out of 26 from 2013 to 2015.

**In 2003, Orbital Sciences was operating the Pegasus rocket (four launches), ILS was launching out of both Florida and Kazakhstan (I counted based on launch site) and Boeing and Lockheed had yet to merge as ULA. USA outscored Russia by 23 to 21 that year by  my count.

Around the Solar System

Here’s a cool new “self-portrait” panorama from the Curiosity rover on Mars.

Here are some new images from Dawn’s new low mapping orbit at Ceres.

Weekly Links

Down to Earth

A “topping off” ceremony was held at Space Launch Complex 41 in Florida, which will be the launchpad for the Boeing “commercial crew” capsule that will send astronauts to the ISS.

The crew of Soyuz TMA-17M undocked from the ISS and landed back on Earth this past Friday. Here’s a cool shot of the landing site after the recovery team had arrived (click to see larger on Flickr).

Expedition 45 Soyuz TMA-17M Landing (NHQ201512110002)

The crew of Oleg Kononenko, Kimiya Yui, and Kjell Lindgren were in good spirits upon extraction from their capsule, despite the subfreezing temperatures on the Kazakh steppe.  Here are some shots of them smiling just after touchdown (yes, I’m calling that a “smile” from Oleg).

Expedition 45 Soyuz TMA-17M Landing (NHQ201512110004)

Expedition 45 Soyuz TMA-17M Landing (NHQ201512110006)

Expedition 45 Soyuz TMA-17M Landing (NHQ201512110014)

Over the weekend, the new Soyuz rocket for the next ISS crew to launch was raised on the launch pad in Kazakhstan in anticipation for a Tuesday launch.

Expedition 46 Soyuz Rollout (NHQ201512130026)

(All photos in the section above from the NASA Flickr stream)

In Orbit

Before the TMA-17M crew left ISS, they helped out Commander Scott Kelly with the capture and berthing of the new Cygnus cargo craft, also known as the SS Deke Slayton. It is a beautiful spacecraft.

In launch news, there were three launches this past week: one Chinese and two Russian. All communication or Earth-observing satellites. One of the Russian launches was a Zenit rocket carrying a weather satellite. This is reportedly going to be the last launch of the Ukranian built Zenit. The other launches were a Russian Proton rocket with a communications satellite and a Chinese Long March 3B/E carrying a communications satellite.

In the coming week, it looks like there may be several more launches, but he most exciting should be the Soyuz crewed launch and then hopefully the Falcon 9 return-to-flight by SpaceX next Saturday. It looks like Russia, USA, and China may be in a race for “most launches in 2015” as we head into the last two weeks of the year, at least according to this running count from Wikipedia:

Screen shot 2015-12-13 at 9.15.45 PM

Current launch count as of 12/13/15 according to “2015 in Spaceflight”

Around the Solar System

Researchers with the Dawn mission, in orbit of dwarf planet Ceres, believe that the “bright spots” on the asteroids surface could be caused by salty water which makes its way to the surface and then sublimates.

Because it’s just so darn beautiful, check out this picture of Saturn’s Moon Prometheus taken by Cassini last week during a close flyby:

Weekly Links

Down to Earth

I love this new “hedgehog” rover concept, designed for low gravity environments like asteroids.

SpaceX released new imagery of the redesigned interior of their crewed Dragon capsule.

In Orbit

Tonight, the Expedition 44 crew of Gennady Padalka, Andreas Mogensen, and Aidyn Aimbetov will undock from the International Space Station and land in Kazakhstan. Follow along on NASA TV, with undocking at 5:29 PM Eastern.

During his short stay on ISS, Mogensen has been very busy trying to get as much science and engineering done for the European Space Agency as he can, including remotely operating a robot on the ground from space! Very cool.

Here’s a quick video from Mogensen about living in ESA’s Columbus module on ISS.

Early Friday morning, the European Space Agency launched a Soyuz rocket with two Galileo satellites into orbit. Galileo is ESA’s analog to the American launched GPS navigation system. Galileo is up to 10 satellites in orbit, but it will take many more to have a complete system (GPS has 31 active satellites).

Check out this shot of the ISS passing in front of the sun.

And you have to love this timelapse of aurora as seen from the ISS.

Around the Solar System

Check out the new high resolution imagery from the New Horizons Pluto probe, just downlinked this week.

There is also new higher resolution imagery of the bright spots on dwarf planet Ceres.

Out There

Astronomers have found the most distant galaxy ever detected, at 13.2 billion light years away.

Weekly Links

Down To Earth

Last Monday, SpaceX announced preliminary findings related to the loss of a Falcon 9 rocket and its Dragon cargo mission last month. Here’s the companies official statement on their investigation so far. They have found that a structural support (or “strut”) holding up a pressurant tank in the second stage failed. Elon Musk hopes a delay of only a few months to their manifest.

Tony Antonelli, who piloted two space shuttle missions, has retired from the astronaut office.

The Smithsonian Institution has started a new Kickstarter campaign called “Reboot the Suit” to raise money to restore Neil Armstrong’s moonsuit. The restoration is planned to be completed in time for a new exhibit for the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 in 2019. I pledged!

In Orbit

Three launches from the Earth’s three spacefaring nation’s this past week: first, a Russian Soyuz rocket launched from Kazakhstan on July 22nd, followed a few hours later by a successful docking to ISS. The crew is now back up to full strength of 6, with the addition of Oleg Kononenko, Kimiya Yui, and Kjell Lindgren. Lindgren and Yui are on Twitter, so you should follow my “people in space” Twitter list.

Second, a Delta IV rocket launched from Florida on July 23rd. The mission delivered a new military communications satellite to orbit.

China also had a successful orbital launch last week. A Long March 3B delivered two navigation satellites to orbit on July 25th.

Around the Solar System

New pictures from the New Horizons’ Pluto flyby! Check out the new views of small moons Nix and Hydra.

Also, check out this view of the dark side of Pluto, with the sun lighting up its thin nitrogen atmosphere!

via Universe Today

Not to mention they discovered nitrogen glaciers!

via Universe Today

Closer to home, at Ceres, the Dawn spacecraft has discovered evidence of a “haze” in Occator crater. This is the large crater with several “bright spots” in its center.

JAXA is accepting applications to choose a name for asteroid 1999 JU3 which will be visited by their Hayabusa-2 spacecraft.

Out There

NASA announced the discovery of Kepler-452b, a small planet around a Sun-like star about 1,400 light years distant. This is the most similar planet in size and circumstance to Earth that we have yet found, but it still has 1.6 times Earth’s diameter (mass, and thus surface gravity, unknown). However, the fact that it is so small and in the habitable zone, makes it an awesome discovery.