Weekly Links

Down to Earth

A “topping off” ceremony was held at Space Launch Complex 41 in Florida, which will be the launchpad for the Boeing “commercial crew” capsule that will send astronauts to the ISS.

The crew of Soyuz TMA-17M undocked from the ISS and landed back on Earth this past Friday. Here’s a cool shot of the landing site after the recovery team had arrived (click to see larger on Flickr).

Expedition 45 Soyuz TMA-17M Landing (NHQ201512110002)

The crew of Oleg Kononenko, Kimiya Yui, and Kjell Lindgren were in good spirits upon extraction from their capsule, despite the subfreezing temperatures on the Kazakh steppe.  Here are some shots of them smiling just after touchdown (yes, I’m calling that a “smile” from Oleg).

Expedition 45 Soyuz TMA-17M Landing (NHQ201512110004)

Expedition 45 Soyuz TMA-17M Landing (NHQ201512110006)

Expedition 45 Soyuz TMA-17M Landing (NHQ201512110014)

Over the weekend, the new Soyuz rocket for the next ISS crew to launch was raised on the launch pad in Kazakhstan in anticipation for a Tuesday launch.

Expedition 46 Soyuz Rollout (NHQ201512130026)

(All photos in the section above from the NASA Flickr stream)

In Orbit

Before the TMA-17M crew left ISS, they helped out Commander Scott Kelly with the capture and berthing of the new Cygnus cargo craft, also known as the SS Deke Slayton. It is a beautiful spacecraft.

In launch news, there were three launches this past week: one Chinese and two Russian. All communication or Earth-observing satellites. One of the Russian launches was a Zenit rocket carrying a weather satellite. This is reportedly going to be the last launch of the Ukranian built Zenit. The other launches were a Russian Proton rocket with a communications satellite and a Chinese Long March 3B/E carrying a communications satellite.

In the coming week, it looks like there may be several more launches, but he most exciting should be the Soyuz crewed launch and then hopefully the Falcon 9 return-to-flight by SpaceX next Saturday. It looks like Russia, USA, and China may be in a race for “most launches in 2015” as we head into the last two weeks of the year, at least according to this running count from Wikipedia:

Screen shot 2015-12-13 at 9.15.45 PM

Current launch count as of 12/13/15 according to “2015 in Spaceflight”

Around the Solar System

Researchers with the Dawn mission, in orbit of dwarf planet Ceres, believe that the “bright spots” on the asteroids surface could be caused by salty water which makes its way to the surface and then sublimates.

Because it’s just so darn beautiful, check out this picture of Saturn’s Moon Prometheus taken by Cassini last week during a close flyby:

December 13, 2015 10:00 pm

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