Weekly Links

Down to Earth

The current head of JPL for 15 years, Charles Elachi, is retiring. Here’s a brief but good interview with him from Pasadena Star News.

NASA has delayed its decision to award ISS cargo flight contracts starting in 2018 until next year. The current contracts being fulfilled by SpaceX and Orbital Sciences run out in a few years and 5 companies have submitted proposals for the new award (SpaceX, Orbital, Sierra Nevada, Boeing, and Lockheed Martin).

NASA will be accepting applications for a new class of astronauts starting December 14th.

In Orbit

Scott Kelly and Kjell Lindgren completed their second of two planned spacewalks during their ISS mission this past Friday.

In orbital rocket news, China had two launches last week: first, a communication satellite on November 3rd and a military reconnaissance satellite on November 8th, bringing their total on the year to 14 with no failures. For comparison, the USA is 16 for 18, Russia is 19 for 21, and ESA is 7 for 7.

A new US Air Force rocket, intended for small payloads, was supposed to reach orbit from the Hawaiian Island of Kauai last week, but had an anomaly on ascent and was lost.

Speaking of rockets, a submarine-launched missile test was seen by many residents on the US west coast on Saturday evening, November 7th.

Around the Solar System

Newly-announced findings from NASA’s MAVEN spacecraft are helping scientists determine what happened to Mars’ atmosphere. Mars has no powerful magnetic field like Earth, so it is suspected that the solar wind has been blasting Mars’ atmosphere away into space over the eons.

The New Horizons spacecraft has now completed all four course correction burns needed (assuming they are all on target) to get to object 2014 MU69 in 2019.

November 8, 2015 7:57 pm

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