Weekly links

Down to Earth

There was a workshop in Houston last week for technical discussion about selecting future landings sites for missions to Mars. It may seem a bit premature, with NASA saying missions to Mars won’t occur for 20 years, but engineers would like to take advantage of the excellent capabilities of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to get early high resolution imagery of potential targets.

The US Congress passed a federal budget bill that avoids “continuing resolution” levels of funding for the rest of Fiscal Year 2016. The appropriations negotiations for specifics, like how much money NASA will receive, is not yet decided, but generally a budget provides more flexibility than a continuing resolution. Bottom line is that space policy fans have to wait to see how their favorite NASA programs are affected, but this is hopefully good news.

Check out this article at The Atlantic that does a good job of explaining the complexities and nuances in the political battle over the construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope on Maunakea in Hawai’i.

In Orbit

In rocket news, only one Chinese launch along with the launch of a new GPS satellite from Florida this past week. The next launch to the ISS will be a Cygnus resupply on top of an Atlas V rocket in early December. Later today, the first orbital launch from Hawai’i’s island of Kauai will take off from USAF’s Pacific Missile Range Facility.

Up on the ISS, astronauts Scott Kelly and Kjell Lindgren got to go on their first EVA ever! The EVA had a variety of tasks (it was in fact referred to here at mission control ambiguously as simply the “ISS Upgrades EVA”). The guys get a second walk outside later this week on Friday, November 2nd.

Meanwhile, on November 2nd, NASA marked 15 continuous years of habitation onboard the ISS.

Around the Solar System

The Cassini spacecraft conducted one of its closest flybys of Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus, passing within 30 miles of the surface and flying right through the “plumes” of water ice flowing out from the subsurface ocean.

A recent astronomical study of Europa – an icy moon of Jupiter with an ocean, much like Enceladus – revealed areas on the surface that appear to have a unique composition, probably caused by the sea water mixing with the surface ice.

A very large asteroid (2,000 feet) called 2015 TB145 flew past Earth this past weekend at a distance of about half a million kilometers. Heres a radar image of the rock; here’s some videos of the flyby.

The New Horizons spacecraft has conducted the first of its course correction thruster firings needed to reach its next target – a small Kuiper Belt object flyby in 2019.

November 3, 2015 7:00 am

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