Weekly Links

Down to Earth

Unfortunately, putting Sally Ride in the US Capitol Statuary Hall is on hold. The issue is that Father Junipero Serra’s statue would be removed and he is expected to be canonized soon. The bill was on the docket in the California state legislature (I linked to the original proposal back in April).

Johann-Dietrich Woerner, as of July 1, is the new the ESA Director General. Previously, he was the head of the German space agency.

My favorite news of the week, other than all the goings-on with the ISS below, is that Houston’s Ellington field has been granted a Launch Site License by the FAA. This means it could be a “spaceport” in the future. It would be pretty cool to see takeoffs and landings of space vehicles from just down the road here!

In Orbit

As of June 29th, Gennady Padalka, current commander of Expedition 44 onboard ISS, became the most-flown astronaut or cosmonaut. The previous record of 803 cumulative days in space, held by Sergei Krikalev ,was broken by Padalka on Tuesday. He will get to almost 900 days before he comes home in September. Krikalev’s flew in space six times, while this is Padalka’s fifth.

Of course, the biggest news of the week was the loss of SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket on June 28th. The rocket was launched to send another Dragon capsule to the ISS for their 7th resupply flight (8th if you count the demo mission). The rocket came apart just a couple of minutes into the flight. Here’s the video:

SpaceX will of course have to do an investigation of the failure, and possibly make some design changes, before their next flight. Some important but not critical ISS cargo was lost on the mission, like a new docking adapter and spacesuit parts. There’s a good cargo list on Wikipedia, or check out this post from Parabolic Arc.

Fortunately, given that the ISS has many partners, including four redundant rockets used for resupply, the loss of one SpaceX mission hopefully won’t pose a longterm problem for the program. Just last night, Russia launched a Progress resupply spacecraft, which will dock to ISS tomorrow. The Progress brings all kinds of cargo, including propellant, food, water, and other supplies.

It is interesting to look at some numbers with SpaceX. The launch failure was their first with the Falcon 9 rocket, which had previously had 18 successful flights. Also, before the failure, they had launched five Falcon 9 flights successfully in 2015. Their previous record flight rate was 6 flights in 2014. They could still fly more this year depending on how the failure investigation goes. Parabolic Arc has a nice breakdown of what their upcoming manifest looked like before the failure.

As usual, ISS commander Scott Kelly posted some great photos of Earth from space over the last week:

Around the Solar System

Update from comet 67PP/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: mission controllers are still trying to establish consistent contact with the Philae lander. Meanwhile, the Rosetta orbiter is doing awesome science, like discovering lots of surface ice and sinkholes (I think I’d rather call them “air pockets”).

Check out the obvious red color (probably caused by hydrocarbons, not rust) in recent images of Pluto from New Horizons. Only 2 weeks until rendezvous, and NASA has given the all-clear for the close encounter on the current orbit. No new hazards (moons or rings) have been spotted in Pluto orbit.

July 3, 2015 5:00 pm

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