Weekly Links

Down to Earth

SpaceX officially received certification from the United States Air Force (USAF) to launch military payloads.

NASA has officially ordered the first official crew rotation flight to ISS under the contracts awarded to Boeing and SpaceX last year. Boeing is expected to make this flight (after a demo flight) in late 2017.

At NASA’s Stennis Space Center, the new RS-25 rocket engine went through a long duration test firing. The RS-25 is a modified space shuttle main engine and will be used on NASA’s new SLS rocket. Here is the full video of the 450 second (7.5 minute) test:

A new venture called MarsPolar hopes to work with SpaceX to mount the first expeditions to Mars. They have a rather shiny website (and an awesome logo). There are a lot of ambitious people promising big dreams these days, which is exciting. But it is hard to take these announcements seriously until we start seeing results. I wish them luck!

In Orbit

The big event on ISS last week was the relocation of the Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) from the bottom of ISS to another out of the way port, so that the previous location can be used as a docking port. Here are some images and timelapses of the operation:

The ISS is currently in perpetual twilight during a time of year we call “high beta”. This often means frequent and very bright ISS passes for much of the world. My favorite way to look up whether ISS will be flying over my location is with the website Heavens Above.

In rocket news, only one orbital rocket launched in the past week: an Ariane 5 rocket carrying a DirecTV satellite. The next ISS related launches are expected to be a SpaceX launch late in June and hopefully also the next Progress launch.

Around the solar System

As New Horizons is now less than two months from closest approach to Pluto, we are getting higher resolution images of the dwarf planet every week. Here is the latest batch. Here’s an animation of the imagery (via APOD):

These images are more than just pretty pictures. The New Horizons mission control team is watching Pluto and its moons closely throughout approach to ensure no hazards will destroy the spacecraft at the close encounter. Analysis so far is good.

If you are excited about the Pluto mission, maybe you should download the new “Pluto Safari” iPhone app. I have downloaded it, but not played with it yet.

May 30, 2015 12:00 pm

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